ERNST LUDWIG KIRCHNER
Drawings
6 April through 7 May 2005
UPPER EAST SIDE, NEW YORK
 

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner (1880-1938) was one of the most prolific and creative artists of the German Expressionist movement of the early twentieth century. Educated at the Technische Hochschule in Dresden, he and his colleagues Fritz Bleyl, Karl Schmidt-Rottluff and the contemporary literary mind Emil Nolde founded the Die Brücke group (the Bridge) in 1906 as a means to integrate more expressive work into the art scene. They were strongly influenced by a variety of sources: Albrecht Dürer, Edward Munch, Vasilij Kandisnsky, and even primitive African sculpture. As a leader of this group, Kirchner developed his personal style, producing an extensive amount of work and exhibiting it regularly. He went on to have major exhibitions at the Nationalgalerie Berlin (1921), Kunsthalle Basel (1923), and Kunsthalle Berne (1933). But from 1926 he suffered from depression, which worsened in 1937 when works were confiscated from public collections by the Nazi regime; thirty-two were included in Hitler's Entartete Kunst (Degenerate Art) exhibition held in Munich. This exhibition is accompanied by a full-color catalogue.